The Igara is a wreck off the East Coast of Malaysia that sank on 12 March 1973. At the time of her sinking, the Igara was the largest ever single marine insurance loss in maritime history. Valued at over US$25 million, she was loaded with 127,718 tonnes of Brazilian Iron Ore. The Igara was an Italian ore/oil steamship of 136,400 tonnes deadweight (DWT). It was on voyage from Vitoria to Muroran when after passing through the Sunda Strait, she struck an uncharted rock in the South China Sea about 190 miles (310 km) from Horsburgh Lighthouse, off Mendarik Island, on 11 March 1973. However, she did not sink immediately but continued her voyage until her bow settled submerged and resting on the sea bottom in approx 40 metres of water about 70 miles (110 km) from Singapore. She settled with her entire stern section sticking out of the water. The following day 27 of the 38-man crew abandoned ship, being picked up in their lifeboats by passing vessels. The master and 10 crew stayed on board until 19 March, when she began to break across hold no. 1. Salvors used explosives to cut through the ship at hold no. 1, and the entire rear section of the ship was towed to Japan, where a new forward section was attached and she was renamed the Eraclide (Source: Wikipedia)
We consider the Igara as our "House Wreck" and  dived her many times. Part of our Divemaster and Technical Dive Training was on the Igara, too! 
Rope Room
Rope Room
The Rope Room
The Rope Room
Rope Room
Rope Room
Rope Room
Rope Room
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The Crack
The service shaft
The service shaft
Service Shaft
Service Shaft
The winch room
The winch room
The winch room
The winch room
The winch room
The winch room
The winch room
The winch room
The winch room
The winch room
The Winch Room
The Winch Room
Penetration dive between the inner and outer hull
Penetration dive between the inner and outer hull
Penetration dive between the inner and outer hull
Penetration dive between the inner and outer hull
The Staircase
The Staircase
The Staircase
The Staircase
The Staircase
The Staircase
The Staircase
The Staircase
Top structure
Top structure
Top structure
Top structure
Top Structure
Top Structure
Top Structure
Top Structure
Top Structure
Top Structure
Top Structure
Top Structure
Top structure
Top structure
Top structure
Top structure
Top structure
Top structure
Deco Stop
Deco Stop
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